How to make a series circuit with 2 bulbs

how to make a series circuit with 2 bulbs

Method 1 - Basic observation 1. Set up the circuits with 2 bulbs in series. 2. Switch on. 3. Observe the brightness of the bulbs. 4. Remove (by unscrewing) one of the bulbs. Observe the effect on the other bulb. 5. Set up the circuit with 2 bulbs in parallel. 6. Repeat steps 2 to 4 with this. Mar 19,  · Have you seen twinkling lights at Diwali or Christmas? They are small bulbs, all in one line. They use the principle of Series Circuit where all the bulbs ar.

Components, eg bulbs, may be connected in series or parallel in a circuit. The specified practical investigates the differences between the two types of circuits by observing the brightness of the bulbs, the effect of 'blowing' or removing a bulb. To compare the differences between a series circuit and a parallel circuit. Set up the circuits with 2 bulbs in series. Switch on. Observe the brightness of the bulbs.

Remove by unscrewing one of the bulbs. Observe the effect on the other bulb. Set up the circuit with 2 bulbs in parallel. Repeat steps 2 to 4 with this circuit. Set up the series circuit with 2 bulbs. Connect a voltmeter across each of the bulbs in turn and also the battery. Record all of your measurements. Set up the parallel circuit with 2 bulbs. Connect a voltmeter across each of the bulbs in turn and also across the battery. Connect an ammeter in each of the 3 positions shown in turn.

Connect an ammeter in each of the positions shown in turn. Placing the bulbs in series causes the resistance of the pair to be double that of a single bulb because there is only one path for the electrons to follow - the supply must drive current through one bulb and then the other.

Suggest a reason why placing the bulbs in parallel causes the resistance to be half that of a single bulb. A yellow pennant- shaped sign indicates what of the characteristics of series and parallel circuits Components, eg bulbs, may be connected in series or parallel in a circuit. Aim of the experiment To compare the differences between a series circuit and a parallel circuit.

Method 1 - Basic observation. Heating of wires and bulbs. Minor burns. Set up circuit before closing the switch and switch off before moving the voltmeter or ammeter in the circuit.

Series and parallel circuits

bulb from a parallel circuit? 1. Set up a parallel circuit with 2 bulbs. 2. Now, come and pick up a bulb holder with the bulb removed. Swap it out with one of the bulbs in your parallel circuit. 3. What happened to the other bulb? 4. Why? Removing a Bulb.

This article was co-authored by Ralph Childers. Ralph Childers is a master electrician based in the Portland, Oregon area with over 30 years of conducting and teaching electrical work.

Ralph received his B. This article has 12 testimonials from our readers, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed , times. When connecting electrical devices to a power source, they can be hooked up to make either a series circuit or a parallel circuit. In a parallel circuit, the electrical current flows along several paths, and each individual device is hooked up to its own circuit. The advantage to a parallel circuit is that if one device malfunctions, the flow of electricity will not stop, as it will in a series circuit.

Additionally, several devices can be hooked up to the power source at once, without decreasing the overall wattage output. Creating your own parallel circuit is simple, and is thus a great project to perform to be able to see for yourself how electricity works. To make a parallel circuit, first cut 2 8-inch and 2 4-inch strips of aluminum foil, each the width of a straw.

Then, connect one 8-inch strip to the positive terminal of a 9-volt battery and the other to the negative terminal. Wrap the loose end of each 4-inch strip around its own lightbulb. For information from our Licensed Electrician reviewer on how to build your circuit with wires and a switch, read on!

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No account yet? Create an account. Edit this Article. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article methods. Tips and Warnings. Related Articles. Article Summary. Method 1 of Consider the age and skill of those involved.

Creating a parallel circuit is an excellent and easy experiment for students learning about electricity. This method of building a parallel circuit is excellent for younger students: they may have limited dexterity, and you may not want them to use sharp tools. If you are making a parallel circuit as part of a lesson plan, it may help to have your students or child make a list of questions, predictions, and hypotheses about what they'll be observing.

Choose your power source. The cheapest and most convenient power source for your parallel circuit project is a battery. A 9-volt battery is an excellent choice. Choose your load. This is the item that you'll be hooking up to the power source. You can make a parallel circuit with light bulbs you'll need 2 ; flashlight bulbs are also a good choice. Prepare your conductors. Use aluminum foil as your conductor to build this type of parallel circuit.

The foil will be used to connect the power source to the loads. Cut the foil into 4 narrow strips: 2 8 in 20 cm pieces, and 2 4 in 10 cm pieces. They should be narrow, about the width of a drinking straw. Connect the first of the conducting strips to the battery. You're now ready to start hooking up your parallel circuit.

Take one of the 8 in 20 cm strips of foil and connect it to the positive terminal of the battery. Hook up your lightbulbs. You're now ready to connect your loads to the conducting material. Take the 2 shorter 4 in 10 cm strips and wrap one end of each around the long strip coming off the positive terminal. Place one 4 in 10 cm strip near the top of the strip, and the other about 3 inches 7. You may find it helpful to secure the strips with electrical tape.

Complete the parallel circuit. Once you finish connecting all of the elements of the parallel circuit, your lightbulbs should glow. Place the ends of the 2 light bulbs against the 8 in 20 cm strip of foil that is attached to the negative terminal of the battery.

The lightbulbs should now shine brightly! Method 2 of Choose this method for a slightly advanced project. While creating a parallel circuit is not complicated, this method requires you to use wire and a switch; it may be suited for slightly older students. For example, this method will require you to strip wires, but if you lack the necessary tools for this or don't want young ones performing this task, you may prefer to read the method explained above. Gather the main components of a parallel circuit.

You don't need much to complete this project: You need a power source, a conducting material, at least 2 loads the items which use electricity , and a switch. Use a 9-volt battery as the power source. You'll be using insulated wire as your conducting material. Any kind will work, but copper-wire should be easy to find.

You'll be cutting the wire into several pieces, so make sure you have plenty 30—40 inches 76— cm should do it. For the load, use light bulbs or flashlight bulbs. You should be able to find a switch as well as all of the other materials at any hardware or home improvement store. Prepare your wires. The wire is your conducting material, which will create the circuits between the power source and your leads.

Cut the wire into five pieces between 6—8 inches 15—20 cm will be fine. Wire strippers are the best tool for removing insulation, but if you don't have these, scissors or wire-cutters will work; just be very careful not to damage the wires. Connect the first lightbulb to the battery. Attach 1 of the wires to the positive terminal of the battery and wind the other end around the left side of 1 of the lightbulbs.

Begin to connect the switch to the battery. Take a separate piece of wire and connect it to the negative terminal of the battery.

Take the other end of the wire and connect it to the switch. Connect the switch to the first lightbulb. Using yet another piece of wire, connect it first to the switch, and then wind it around the right side of the first lightbulb.

Connect the second lightbulb. Take your fourth piece of wire and wind it around the left side of the first lightbulb, and then wind the other end around the left side of the second lightbulb. Using your remaining piece of wire, wrap 1 end around the right side of the first lightbulb, and the other end around the right side of the second lightbulb.

Turn on the switch. Flip the switch, and you should see both bulbs light up. Congratulations—you successfully built a parallel circuit! Did you know you can read expert answers for this article? Unlock expert answers by supporting wikiHow. Ralph Childers Electrical Professional. Ralph Childers. Support wikiHow by unlocking this expert answer. Not Helpful 4 Helpful 3.

Not Helpful 9 Helpful 3. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. This will help release the battery if it became old to replace it with a new one. Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1. You may find it helpful to secure all of your connections with electrical tape. Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0.



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