What does ni kan mean in chinese

what does ni kan mean in chinese

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Contextual translation of "ni kan" into English. Human translations with examples: ni, kan, ni ne, hello, cao ni, you see, ni qu nar, wo hao, ni, i like you, kan shen me. Google's free service instantly translates words, phrases, and web pages between English and over other languages.

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories. You see. Wo hao, ni. Ni ne. Ni hao. Cao ni. I like you. Ni Hao. Kan shen me. More context All My memories Ask Google.

Add a translation. Chinese Simplified. Chinese Simplified ni how to take care of boxwood. English You see. Chinese Simplified ni. English ni he shen me. English Wo hao, ni. Chinese Simplified ni kan ma! English ni kan ma! Chinese Simplified Ni. English NI. Chinese Simplified Kan. English Kan. Chinese Simplified NI. Chinese Simplified ni haa.

English hello. Chinese Simplified deng ni. English wo zai deng ni suo. Chinese Simplified Ni ne. English Ni ne. Chinese Simplified ni hao. English you good hello.

Chinese Simplified Ni hao. English Hello. Chinese Simplified ni hame. English shi shi ni ni hame. Chinese Simplified ni qu. English ni qu nar. Chinese Simplified Cao ni.

English Cao ni. Chinese Simplified ni jao. English I like you. Chinese Simplified ni kama. English you are beautyfull. Chinese Simplified Ni Hao. Chinese Simplified ni hao? English um how are you. Chinese Simplified ni kan shen me. English Kan shen me. Get a better translation with 4,, human contributions. We use cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to visit this site you agree to our use of cookies.

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A: ?/?? ni kan dianying bu? kan/bu kan you watch movie not watch/not watch N V-DP-NEG V/NEG V Will you watch the movie? Yes/No V-Object-NEG-V type (debatable).

In linguistics , an A-not-A question , also known as an A-neg-A question, is a polar question that offers two opposite possibilities for the answer. Predominantly researched in Sinitic languages, the A-not-A question offers a choice between an affirmative predicate and its negative counterpart.

Therefore, to properly answer the query, the recipient must select the positive affirmative form "A" or negative negative predicate form "not-A" version and use it in the formation of their response. The overarching principle is the value-neutral contrast of the positive and negative forms of a premise. The label of "A-not-A question" may refer to the specific occurrence of these question types in Mandarin or, more broadly, to encompass other dialect-specific question types such as kam questions in Taiwanese Mandarin or ka questions in Singapore Teochew ST , though these types possess unique properties and can even occur in complementary distribution with the A-not-A question type.

The wider category of A-not-A questions contains multiple distinct forms. These forms are differentiated on the basis of the location of the Negation constituent and the presence or absence of duplicate material.

This is the most atomic form of the A-not-A question, which contains two identical instances of the constituent A separated by negation. This is a more complex form, containing two instances of the complex constituent AB separated by the negation. AB may represent an embedded clause, a subject joined with a prepositional phrase, or a verb phrase containing a DP. This form contains two unique constituents, A and AB, separated by the negation.

This form is similar to the A-not-AB form, but the more complex constituent AB occurs before the negation. This form is only found in instances where A is disyllabic constituent with initial syllable a, and the two constituents are separated by negation. This form is similar to the a-not-A form with a representing the initial syllable of A and the two separated by negation, but A is joined to another constituent to form the complex constituent AB. For the English question 1.

In other words, this sentence is a leading question , where the speaker has an expectation as to what the answer will be. In contrast, 1. A-not-A questions are not usually used in English, but the following example shows how A-not-A questions are answered. As seen in this example, simply answering "Yes" or "No" does not suffice as a response to the question. This question must be answered in the "A" or "not A" form. If this question was asked in the A-not-A pattern, its direct form would be "Did John eat or not eat the beans?

However, the above examples also illustrate that A-not-A type questions in English usually contain some comparative operator such as "or" which is not seen in the Sinitic forms.

There is also no significant evidence of either of the disyllabic A-not-A forms in English. These factors complicate the inclusion of English in the set of languages that contain the A-not-A question type, and though there are close English approximations in some cases, The A-not-A question is more accurately exemplified in Sinitic languages.

Below are examples of English approximations of the A-not-A question. They are similar to the Sinitic A-not-A in that they present two possibilities and require an echoed response. However, they include an extra segment "or" in the below examples in order to read grammatically, which changes these approximations to an alternative question AltQ type. Nevertheless, for the convenience of understanding this phenomenon from the perspective of an English speaker, the below examples are included to provide context.

It is proposed that the A-not-A sequence is morpheme created by the reduplication of the interrogative morpheme represented by the A in A-not-A. This Morpheme is referred to as NQ in order to represent its character as negative and interrogative. An extensive cross-dialectic survey conducted in concluded that the Taiwanese question particle kam appears in the same contexts as the hypothesized Mandarin NQ.

It was also interpreted that kam and NQ are "different morphological exponents of the same underlying morpheme". This scoping may be blocked if the original location of NQ and its intended final location are separated by an island boundary. Due to the uncontroversial nature of the movement-based analysis of weishenme, the similarity of the NQ to weishenme implies that NQ amy be subject to the same analysis of its movement.

Due to this syntactic differentiation, A-not-A questions may be contrasted with haishi questions for the purpose of revealing island sensitivity. The following are examples of A-not-A questions in languages belonging to the Sinitic linguistic family. In forming A-not-A questions, A must remain the same on both sides. A is essentially a variable which can be replaced with a grammatical particle such as a modal , adverb, adjective, verb, or preposition.

Example 3 illustrates that A-not-A pattern, where A is the verb qu 'go', and qu bu qu is 'go not go'. This produces rende zhe ge bu rende zhe ge ren , 'know this CL man not know this CL man. Example 5 illustrates the A-not-AB pattern, where A is the verb rende , 'know', AB is the constituent consisting of the A verb rende , 'know', and the complement zhe ge ren , 'this CL man' , as B, combining to form the AB constituent rende zhe ge ren 'know this CL man'.

This produces rende bu rende zhe ge ren , 'know not know this CL man'. Example 6 illustrates the AB-not-A pattern, where AB is the constituent rende zhe ge ren , 'know this CL man' consisting of rende , 'know' as A and zhe ge ren , 'this CL man as B; A is likewise rende , 'know', in the second part of the construction. This produces rende zhe ge ren bu rende , 'know this CL man not know'. Example 7 illustrates the a-not-A pattern, where a is the first syllable, fang , of the disyllabic predicate fangbian , 'convenient', and A is the full predicate fangbian , and fang-bu-fangbian is 'con venient -not convenient'.

Example 8 illustrates the a-not-AB pattern, where a is the first syllable, he , of the disyllabic predicate heshi , 'suitable', and AB is the constituent consisting of heshi , 'suitable' as A and jiao quan , 'teaching fist' as B, combining to form the AB constituent heshi jia quan , 'suitable teaching fist'.

This produces he-bu heshi jian quan , 'suit able -not suitable teaching fist'. A-not-A can be formed by a verb, an adjective, or an adverb, [11] as well as modals. In the interrogative clause , A-not-A occurs by repeating the first part in the verbal group with the option of an auxiliary and the negative form of the particle is placed in between. However, this clause does not apply when using perfective in aspect.

Here, the verb qu , 'go', is A, and there is no object. Here the verb kan , 'watch', is again A, and while there is an object, the object is not included in "A", and is therefore not reduplicated. Here, the verb kan , 'watch', is likewise A, and while the object is included before NEG, it is not included in A, and is therefore not reduplicated, although it remains an option. Here, the verb kan , 'watch', is also used for A, and while the object is included before NEG, it is not included in A, and is therefore not reduplicated.

A is reduplicated here. There is some debate among speakers as to whether or not 3. Here, the adjective hao , 'good', is A, and it is reduplicated. The word ben is a classifier , which means it is a counter word for the noun 'book'. Here, the adjective hao , 'good', is A, but it is not reduplicated. Here, the preposition zai , 'at', is A, and it is reduplicated. Here, the preposition zai , 'at', is A, and it is not reduplicated.

Here, the modal dare is A and it is reduplicated. One distinction in Cantonese when compared to Mandarin is that certain forms of A-not-A questions are not attested due to dialectal differences.

Like its Mandarin counterpart, this form is attested in Cantonese as shown by the sentence pair in 13 , [9] where in example As shown by Here in This would produce the ungrammatical structure zungji jamok m zungji jamok , 'like music not like', which is a poorly-formed sentence in Cantonese.

In the well-formed sentence shown below in This produces xihuant yinyue bu xihuan yinue , 'like music not like music', a grammatical sentence in Mandarin. This form is only attested in Cantonese if the predicate is a monosyllabic word as shown by This can be compared to the Mandarin counterpart in A-not-AB is not attested in Cantonese if the predicate is a bi-syllabic word as shown by This contrasts with its Mandarin counterpart in This form is only attested in Cantonese if the predicate is a monosyllabic word A, exemplified in Note that such forms of AB-not-A in monosyllabic words are used by older generations.

When the predicate is a bi-syllabic word, then AB-not-A form is not attested as shown in Amoy exhibits A-not-A forms, and differs from Mandarin and Cantonese in its frequent use of modals or auxiliaries in forming these constructions. Amoy forms also differ in that the morphemes for A do not match each other in a given sentence. In these constructions one of the morphemes may also be deleted, as can be seen in Examples 27 , 28 , and 29 , though when this happens it may only be deleted from the negative predicate.

The following negative markers are used. While m-1 occurs as a free morpheme with its own semantic feature indicating volition, m-2 is cannot function by itself as a verb and works only to express negation. It is attested only with a limited amount of verbs. Shown below are A-not-A constructions in Amoy. The following is a list of A-not-A constructions in Amoy with auxiliary verbs which may function as the main verb of a sentence.

The auxiliary verb u here functions as an aspectual marker indicating that an action has been completed. In u — bou A-not-A constructions, u functions as the first A, corresponding with the auxiliary 'have', while bou functions as the second A of the A-not-A construction, corresponding with the negative counterpart 'not have'. Example 20 illustrates the use of this construction.

The auxiliary verb bat functions as an aspectual marker indicating experience. In bat — m bat A-not-A constructions, bat functions as the first A, corresponding with an auxiliary expressing the sense of 'to have experienced', while m bat functions as the second A of the A-not-A constructions, corresponding with the negative counterpart 'not to have experienced'.

Example 21 illustrates the use of this construction. The auxiliary verb si works to express emphasis. In si — m si constructions A-not-A constructions, si functions as the first A, roughly corresponding with 'to be', and m si as the second A, indicating the negative counterpart 'not to be'. Example 22 illustrates the use of this construction.

The following is a list of A-not-A constructions in Amoy with auxiliary verbs which may never be used as the main verb of a sentence. The use of a beq — m construction is used to express an intention or an expectation. In these constructions, beq functions as the first A, indicating 'to want to', and m as the second A, here working with beq to express its negative counterpart 'not want to.

The use of a tiouq — m bian construction expresses a sense of obligation. In these constructions, tiouq functions as the first A, indicating 'must', and m bian as the second A, here indicating the negative counterpart 'must not'.

Example 24 illustrates the use of this construction.



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